comerviajaramarhd:

Las tribus retratadas por la fotógrafa británica Matilda Temperley (los mursi y sus vecinos, los Suri), viven en el remoto Valle de Omo, sur de Etiopía. Ellos, junto con sus otros vecinos Surma, se encuentran amenazados por el avance de la “civilización” occidental. El valle del Omo es una encrucijada de culturas y civilizaciones con muchos grupos tribales que rodean el Sudán del Sur, Etiopía y las fronteras de Kenia. Los habitantes han desarrollado sus propios estilos de vestimenta y adornos para diferenciarse de sus vecinos, con los que están frecuentemente en estado de guerra. Las mujeres Mursi, por ejemplo, tienen sus dientes inferiores placas de cerámica que sirven para estirar sus labios. 

Galería de fotos

The tribes portrayed by British photographer Matilda Temperley (the Mursi and their neighbours, the Suri), living in the remote Omo Valley, southern Ethiopia. They, along with its other neighbours Surma, are threatened by the advance of Western “civilization.” The Omo Valley is a crossroads of cultures and civilizations with many tribal groups surrounding South Sudan, Ethiopia and Kenya borders. The inhabitants have developed their own styles of dress and decoration for distinguished from its neighbours, with whom they are often in a state of war. The Mursi women, for example, have their lower teeth ceramic plates that serve to stretch their lips.

(via wild-nirvana)

grimoireandfaeries:

Pacific Sea-Maid (Siren pacificus) and Carribean Mermaid (Siren carribaeanus) from Arthur Spiderwick’s Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You

(via wild-nirvana)

fishingboatproceeds:

So how do communities with limited electricity and running water in Ethiopia reduce infant mortality and dramatically improve newborn and maternal health? 
With a system designed by Ethiopians for Ethiopia, and a lot of amazingly dedicated health extension workers and volunteers. (The tier system is explained in the first picture.) I’m obviously no expert, but from what I could tell the nonprofit funding worked precisely because it was helping people execute their vision, rather than trying to impose a strategy upon them.
Today, I visited a health center and then a health outpost, a small structure with no electricity serving a community of around 5,000. The Outpost (picture two) was staffed by two women who can do everything from treat malaria to deliver babies. They have a detailed and systematic approach (those files in picture three contain information about every family in their area), but they rely on the volunteer Women’s Health Care Army to provide education, prenatal care, and family planning assistance, among many other things, to every family in the area.
It was fascinating to start my journey at a facility that can do Caesarean sections and then follow the health care system into individual residences, where a woman can talk directly to someone she trusts about prenatal vitamins, contraception, and breastfeeding. 

The health challenges here in Ethiopia are massive, obviously, but these volunteers are a big part of the reason that Ethiopia’s infant and maternal mortality rates are dropping so dramatically.
You’ll meet several of them in a forthcoming video, but I just wanted to share the amazingness of today’s experience.

norberthellacopter:

The Grand Budapest Hotel screenshots - cinematography by Robert D. Yeoman - 2013

(via have--not)

2headedsnake:

Andre Elliott

(Source: aelliottphoto.com, via villenoire)

"I love you, but you don’t know what you’re talking about."

Moonrise Kingdom, 2012

(via wild-nirvana)

ivoryunknown:

this may actually be one of my favourite photosets on tumblr

(Source: venula, via wild-nirvana)

jesdaniels:

nakedspirits:

balsamea:

onezia:

Li River, Guangxi Zhuang, China

beautiful… dream of visiting Asia one day

Woah

♡

jesdaniels:

nakedspirits:

balsamea:

onezia:

Li River, Guangxi Zhuang, China

beautiful… dream of visiting Asia one day

Woah

(via marialiria)

wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Nishe

Nishe (aka Magdalena Lutek) is an up-and-coming Polish photographer who beautifully captures feminine, melancholic worlds only to the tune of film and instant film.

Read More